Some Of The Best Jackson Pollock Paintings


A close up of a knife

Introduction:

A group of people posing for a photo

Jackson Pollock was one of the most influential American painters of the twentieth century. Although his paintings were criticized as mindless dribbling, he helped shift modern art away from abstract academicism and towards more personal expressionist forms. Born in 1912, Pollock died tragically young at age 44 – but during his life created a series of works that made him famous. After his death, critics began to re-evaluate the merit of his work and he achieved iconic status within American popular culture. But despite this newfound acceptance, questions over authenticity still dog many of “the drip artists” works. Here are some of the top paintings of Jackson Pollock.

The Blue Unconscious (1946)

One of Pollock’s earliest drip paintings, this work is notable for its muted blue palette and biomorphic shapes. It was created soon after the artist returned from service in World War II, and is seen as a precursor to his later more famous works.

Number 1 (1948):

This painting is one of the most iconic images associated with Jackson Pollock. Consisting of a series of drips and splatters in various shades of black, white, and grey, it has been described as an “abstract expressionist masterpiece”.

Mural (1943):

Commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim for her New York apartment, this massive painting is one of Pollock’s largest works. It measures over 8 feet tall and is composed of multiple canvases that have been joined together.

Autumn Rhythm (Number 30) (1950)

This painting is considered to be a masterpiece of Pollock’s “drip period” and is one of the most famous examples of his abstract expressionist style. The rhythmic patterns of paint dripping across the canvas create an effect that has been likened to music.

No. 5 (1951):

This painting is composed of a series of vertical black lines on a white background. It has been described as an early example of Minimalism and has been seen as a precursor to the works of artists such as Ad Reinhardt and Donald Judd.

Autumn Rhythm (1950):

See Number 30 above – same painting, different title! This is one of Pollock’s most famous drip paintings, completed when he was at the height of his artistic powers. It has been described as a masterpiece of American modernism and is included in the Museum of Modern Art collection in New York City.

Blue Poles (1952):

Created during Pollock’s $2,000 stay on Fire Island, this painting consists of thin blue lines that run side by side across the canvas and create an effect similar to rippling water or electricity. It was created using a unique method that involved dripping paint onto the canvas from long sticks held in both hands.

Number 12 (1951):

Created during Pollock’s $2,000 stay on Fire Island, this painting consists of thin blue lines that run side by side across the canvas and create an effect similar to rippling water or electricity. It was created using a unique method that involved dripping paint onto the canvas from long sticks held in both hands.

The Key (1950):

Part of Pollock’s famous series of “drip periods”, this work is notable for its prominent central drip pattern which mimics the form of an abstract keyhole shape. The painting has been seen as an early example of the artist’s exploration of the relationship between shape and color.

Bird (1947):

Created during Pollock’s ” drip period”, this painting is composed of a series of colorful abstract shapes that have been likened to birds in flight. It is one of the earliest examples of the artist’s use of biomorphic forms in his work.

Greyed Rainbow (1947)

This painting is composed of a series of concentric circles in various shades of grey. It has been described as an early example of Pollock’s exploration of color theory and has been seen as a precursor to his later “drip period” paintings.

White Light (1954):

One of Pollock’s last paintings, this work is notable for its simple composition and bright white color. It has been seen as a return to the artist’s earlier, more abstract style and has been described as a “stunning achievement”.

Black Feathers (1947):

This painting is composed of a series of black lines that resemble feathers. It has been described as an early example of Pollock’s use of biomorphic forms and has been seen as a precursor to his later “drip period” paintings.

Yellow Spray (1951):

This painting is composed of a series of yellow lines that create an effect similar to rippling water or electricity. It was created using a unique method that involved dripping paint onto the canvas from long sticks held in both hands.

One (1951):

This painting is composed of a single black line on a white background. It has been described as an early example of Minimalism and has been seen as a precursor to the works of artists such as Ad Reinhardt and Donald Judd.

A painting of a canyon

Ending Notes:

These are just a few of the most famous paintings by Jackson Pollock. A pioneer of the abstract expressionist movement, his work is now considered to be some of the most important and influential artists of the 20th century.

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